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20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the company's greatest history of leadership and development and our partnering of life science firms. today we'll start the clock on what we'll hope will be a longlar of collaboration between bay area and the most innovative companies in the area. before we introduce the first companies to occupy the area -- -- >> thank you, terry. i guess as everybody knows here, bayer has next year a history of 150 years' of successful r&d. i can assure everybody things have changed how we do r&d over the past 150 years, some things remain the same, which is you need great people talking to each other, networking and when we took a little while ago the decision to move here, it was for very simple reason. we understood that director kelly was not willing to move the whole qb3 do richmond. [ laughter ] as a consequence we wanted to have our scientists in the midst of wonderful, very inspiring campus. however, we never really gave up on the idea of getting creative young people, young start-ups to us. and this is now happening today. establishing the collaborator will mean that we'll attract young comp
for biological purposes, evolutionary purposes, for kids. it is also great for science. if we can get an age out of this mastadon, a mammoth columbi, we will get an age and plug the data into the paleoclimate graphs we have. we have a lot of sea level fluctuations already recorded that. gives us information. we can tie this into a sea level curve of sea level lows, which reflect ice cages and global warmings throughout 600 million years. we use those data to project to the future of what the earth has naturally been doing. it is also good for -- age dates are incredibly important for all walks of geology. we use them to figure out how old young units are. if they are cut by a fault, we know the fault happened and the seismicity occurred after the unit was deposited. if we get an age we can say when. everyone is asking when the next big one will be. based on our recurrence interval based on earthquakes from ages of things like this, we can have a potential hypothesis when the next earthquake will be, based on the fossil finds. it is great for everybody. this is original so we can probably get a
, african-american, latino, islanders specifically were not given those classes, integrated science or integrated math which could get you to graduation, but could never get you to college. that a through g graduation requirement gave them access, so, that's one fabulous thing about this graduation requirement. the other thing is it gives them opportunity. quite frankly, d or better gives them no opportunity. a d or better says will not get them into college. a d or better. and quite frankly it's even cs and d at some colleges. so, d or better is actually not an adequate, i think, level to say that we have graduated with all fairness, have graduated our students prepared to college or a job because d or better is not prepared for college or a job. so, as a board i think if we're going to be looking at this graduation requirement should it be c or better or d or better. we're giving the numbers for both to see how much work we have to do. i think you can see on the chart even with the d or better we have much, much more work to do. this talks with black migration, african-american mi
. and our motto is where science meets community. our team does really cutting edge research on different kinds of prevention strategies, pre-exposure prophylaxis. and if you go to our website, join prep hiv, you'll see all of the many exciting studies that we have as well as our partnership with san francisco city clinic in launching the first demonstration project of pre-exposure prophylaxis, taking antihiv medicines to prevent new infections. we're studying topical gels, retro microbicide. the way we're going to end this epidemic is through a vaccine, we've controlled other infectious diseases through a cure. we're proud of our staff who contribute to this as well as the many study participants. and i'm just going to close with a quick word about the project. the way that this project came about was actually one of our staff members, janey vincent who is our graphic designer, you'll see some of her beautiful work inside, noticed that there was -- she's hiding. (applause) >> she noticed that president obama had designated part of his stimulus money to nih for the national institutes of
of sciences, the garden was designed by the california spring blossom and wildfilower association. here is a truly enchanting and tranquil garden along a path behind a charming gate. this garden is the spot to woo your date. stroll around and appreciate its unique setting. the gorgeous brick walkway and a brick wall, the stone benches, the rustic sundial. chaired the part -- share the bard's word hundred famous verses from a shakespearean plays. this is a gem to share with someone special. pack a picnic, find a bench, and enjoy the sunshine, and let the whimsical words of william shakespeare and floats you and your loved one away. this is one of the most popular wedding locations and is available for reservations. take a bus and have no parking worries. shakespeares' garden is ada accessible. located at the bottom of this hill, it is a secret garden with an infinite in captivating appeal. carefully tucked away, it makes the top of our list for most intimate pyknic setting. avoid all taurus cars and hassles by taking a cable car. or the 30, 45, or 91 bus. the garden was designed by thoma
our police resources wisely or not using science to guide where to use our police resources. we need to look at our transportation system and revolutionize that. that will improve a lot of things, public health, public safety, commerce. so we need to be looking with a vision for the future about what we want our city to be. and i think i have done that before and like i said, i'm for prevention. and i'm for looking to the future and figuring out how we can sculpt a better san francisco and that is what i will do as supervisor. thank you, mr. davis. i want to remind folks and point out that we have seen a disturbing trend in san francisco over the past couple ever years. of years. we have had a lot of leadership appointed for us. an appointed mayor, appointed district attorney when our leaders are chosen for us instead of by us. if you want leadership in our city, i'll i'm your candidate. at juliandavis.org, there is more detail about the grassroots campaign we're building. i encourage you to look where the candidates are getting their money from. i think it says a lot about whose i
of the things we talked about is having their staffing, which talked-about having science. encouraging people to go across the street if they are smoking in large numbers. they have agreed to that. i do not know of that -- if that is conditionable. we are -- to promote that with customers. that we do not have a big smoke cloud. >> it is a big parking lot. so that is perfect. >> is not enforceable but the smoking code says you have to go to the end of the curb. there is no way we can force them to do otherwise. sometimes being a good neighbor and encouraging patrons, there will be compliant. other than that, we're happy with the move. >> any questions for officer mathias? let's hear from the public. are there people from the public who would like to address this permit? your welcome. >> here is a song for the new gold dust. i wrote the song. >> did anyone tell you if you look like stacey slaughter who works for the giants? >> she does. >> you have a twin out there. >> here we go. ♪ in san francisco's fight to save the historic bar ♪ ♪ it was the 23rd of may but we are packing up the piec
is science given at grades five, eight and ten. you see the same double digit trend with the district moving from 51.2 to 51.6. and as i said when we look we have three lenses in which we look at these scores. the first is over time. the second is movement. looking at the same group of students that took the test two years in a row and how did they move in their proficiency level? so we had matched scores for 30,000 students. and when they began the year last year they came in at 60.4 percent proficiency and by the end of the year 62.7 or 63% of them were profishtd. looking at all the proficiency levels and how students moved we found the movement to be around 16.6 percent or 70% to round it which means seven out of every ten students either remained profirkt or advanced or moved up one level. okay. i'm going to repeat that. seven out of every ten students either remained proficient and advanced or moved up a level. in math we found the movement to be at 73% and this was similar to what we saw in [inaudible]. as i said the third lens by which we look at these scores are acceleratio
them one by one disappear. >> this is sort of a merger between art and science and advocacy in a funny way getting people to wake unand realize what is going on -- wake up and realize what is going on. so it is a memborial trying to get us to interpret history and look to the past. they have always been about lacking at the past so we proceed forward and maybe don't commit the same mistakes. i'm derek, i'm hyungry, and ready to eat. these vendors offer a variety of the streets near you. these mobile restaurants are serving up original, creative and unusual combinations. you can grab something simple like a grilled cheese sandwich or something unique like curry. we areher here in the average eight -- upper haight. you will be competing in the quick buy food challenge. an appetizer and if you are the winner you will get the title of the quitck bite "chompion." i am here with matt cohen, from off the grid. >> we assembled trucks and put them into a really unique heurban settings. >> what inspired you to start off the grid? >> i was helping people lodge mobile food trucks. the work asking
not understood]. i'm a san francisco college student majoring in political science. i am the youth commissioner for district 10 appointed by supervisor malea cohen. i spent time in group homes and two consecutive years in juvenile hall. since then i've come a long way and thankful for being part of the youth commission in addition to working with the juvenile department. we heard from the youth and what they expect from the m-o-u. we share similar concerns to how you'ring out feel. we believe that including youth in the selection and valuation of the sro [speaker not understood] between our youth and officers. we, too, believe that adequate training for our police on how to deal with the city's young people will ensure safety between the police and our youth. in our historical joint hearing between the police and the youth commission on march 7th of this year we had three simple recommendations that were agreed to by the chief. one of which included an updated m-o-u and i have three here for you so you guys can see. one of which included an updated m-o-u in addition to a widespread pamphlet and
what i learned in my math or science class or english class in the job that i got paid for this summer, so it is more that we can expect the curriculum to real world experiences that students understand are going to connect them to what they're going to do in the future i think the more engaging the curriculum becomes and the more we keep the students engaged and i am committing publicly we want the students involved and we want your feedback. >> about what about the simpler things and the resources? because a lot of students -- muni passes and students can't access the schools without getting on the back of the bus and maybe a chance of getting caught by the muni police? or the simple stuff like the libraries? and access to printers? what if there is not access at homes? what about the simpler things for students? >> great idea. you probably notice we're taking notes. i think they're great ideas and again we're going to be tapping your ideas about how do we really engage the authentic student voices and not only at high school level but middle school and elementary school as wel
about literacy development, curriculum development, and also science and technology, engineering and math. some examples in the out of school time activities are kindergarten through 8 students. you see tutoring and mentoring is a key highlight. san francisco students back on track. across the cities we also have beacon centers. so, again, they have on-site services. for example, visitacion valley school and [speaker not understood]. one is more complicated. it includes teens programming. the first line is specialized out of school teen programming. what students [speaker not understood] project based learning and they get to showcase their work at the end of the curriculum. summer transition program is something that we will be funding in the upcoming funding cycle. we currently have summer programming which i'll explain a little more later. work force is a very key component to ensure us -- students succeeding in school. we have relevant learning. we have work services in the school site and also after school. [speaker not understood]. we fund 15 centers, 15 different high scho
associate degree, two associate degrees. one in social sciences and behavior and another in administration of justice. currently at san francisco state working on my bachelor's degree in justice studies and also with a minor in urban planning. the reason why i would like to be a part of the balboa park station citizen's advisory committee is because i would like to represent the voice of the community, more specifically in the development that is occurring in the area. i would also like to assist in figuring out how to keep the community voice involved and accountability with the city agencies involved and impact to make deadlines and [speaker not understood] commitments. and then, so, also john avalos is a huge advocate for our community, but it's important to have the community involved. >> thank you, ms. garcia. >>> thank you very much. >> and next we will hear mr. walker. if you would like to speak today. and are there any other applicants that were not listed? okay. oh, i'm sawyer, i thought you were not here today. >>> i'm not alex. i'm henry [speaker not understood]. >> great. so, h
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)